California Trout Fishing Lakes
Ca Trout Fishing Lakes
Eagle Lake
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Big Bear Lake
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Shasta Lake
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Mammoth Lakes
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Lake Almanor
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Lake Oroville
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Folsom Lake
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Lake Isabella
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Crowley Lake
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June Lake Loop
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New Melones Lake
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Lakes McClure & McSwain
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Lake Camanche
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Trinity Lake
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Lake Berryessa
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Convict Lake
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Lake Casitas
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Lake Silverwood
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Donner Lake
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Lewiston Lake
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Lake Cachuma
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Lake Don Pedro
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Pine Flat Lake
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Lake Amador
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Shaver Lake
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Irvine Lake
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Bridgeport Reservoir
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Huntington Lake
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Pardee Lake
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Gold Lakes Basin
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Marble Mountain Wilderness
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Trout Rivers & Creeks
Sacramento River
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Kern River
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Owens River
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McCloud River
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Feather River
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Truckee River
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Fall River
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Pit River
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Hat Creek
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Rush Creek

 

 

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California Trout Fishing

Trout Fishing in California is enjoyed by anglers on many outstanding Lakes, Rivers and Creeks throughout the Golden State. You will find great fishing for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Brook Trout no matter what part of California you travel to and the next state record catch could be at the end of your line. CaliforniaTroutFishing.org is your #1 source for detailed California Trout Fishing information on the best Trout Fishing Lakes, Rivers and Creeks.

California Trout Fishing

California Rainbow Trout Fishing

Rainbow Trout are the most abundant of the trout species in California waters. They have been extensively studied in both hatchery and natural environments, more than any other type of trout. The Rainbow Trout is an exceptionally strong, hearty fish and they can survive in water temperatures ranging from 32 to 80 degrees. They are excellent swimmers and in many California Rivers and Creeks you should look for them on the downstream side of large rocks or boulders. Rainbows will locate here both for an ambush point and as an energy conserving measure. They are very territorial, seeking good cover among logs, roots, and tree stumps in lakes and rivers, and especially the shady undercut edges of little streams.

 

Rainbow Trout feed primarily on insects in streams, often preferring stonefly and caddisfly. In many California Lakes, threadfin shad minnows comprise the major portion of their diet. Thus, Rainbow Trout are susceptible to both fly fishing techniques and casting artificial lures that represent the shad baitfish. Garden worms, nightcrawlers, marshmallows, grasshoppers, crickets, live shad, and salmon eggs will all take their share of Rainbow Trout on most California Lakes and Rivers.

 

California Brown Trout Fishing

 

Brown Trout are a popular catch in many California Lakes, Rivers and Creeks. They are not quite as adaptable as Rainbow Trout as they thrive in slightly cooler waters, preferably 54 to 64 degrees. These fish are also typically very touchy feeders. Biologists note that because of their basic diet, you will see little surface action from Brown Trout. They will often seek out larger larvae and bigger prey including crayfish, frogs, newts and worms. Brown Trout are also known to feed on forage baitfish and smaller trout.

 

Figure on catching Brown Trout at greater depths than other trout. They like deep pools and steep banks in rivers as well as steep alpine lakes. Often the largest Brown Trout taken in California Lakes are caught by faster trolling methods. Flashers with bait trailers will work and they will also hit artificial flies, but prefer more of the wet patterns that represent larvae and larger aquatic insects or small baitfish. For bait fishing, it is hard to beat live worms, grasshoppers and nightcrawlers.

 

California Brook Trout Fishing

 

Brook Trout can be found in many California Lakes, Rivers and Creeks and are characterized by the brilliant red and blue spots on their sides. They have exceptional reproductive capacities, often spawning under rather diverse conditions not conducive for other trout. This is both good and bad. On the positive side, Brook Trout will be found in a wide variety of higher elevation lakes and streams. In California Rivers and Creeks, look for Brook Trout in the more sheltered areas, particularly in the shady undercut banks. They can be found in the shallow sections of California Lakes, preferring gravel banks and downed timber for shelter.

 

Brook Trout can actually actively feed down to 34 degrees, which makes them a prime candidate for the ice angler. This trout is most active in water temperatures ranging from 57 to 61 degrees. They are rarely found in California Lakes or Rivers where summer temperatures reach 68 degrees or above. Brook Trout are similar to Rainbow Trout in their preference for lures and baits. Smaller spoons, spinners, and minnow-like lures can be effective. Live red worms, salmon eggs, and velveeta cheese are also favored baits for Brook Trout. Fly fishermen can test their prowess with a dry fly, as Brook Trout will readily rise to an insect hatch on the surface.

 

California Trout Fishing Tips

Trout are very conscious of the need to conserve energy because they cannot afford to expend it. This means that they are "lazy" and will seldom chase anything a long distance. In fact, fish must rest a long time if they expend effort through a burst of energy. Fatigue will set in quickly and it can take hours to recover. Although the rate of energy consumption will vary with the size and type of fish, there is a rule of thumb that depicts them in general. They can swim slowly, at about 5 body lengths per second, and suffer no fatigue. Or they can swim in bursts of up to 20 body lengths per second and suffer rapid fatigue.

 

Migrating Trout in California waters will tend to budget their energy activities, every so many hours finding resting and feeding stations to regain energy levels. The point is that trout will prefer resting areas where they do not have to swim against currents, or they do not need to swim far for protection. They will seek areas where they do not have to spend much energy catching food. Many of these places on any body of water in California are quite obvious.

 

The position of the sun is another factor that needs to be considered when fishing for trout. Fish will avoid the brightness and will move down in the water when the sun is bright. The expression is "sun up, fish down, sun down, fish up". This will make any shade areas much more desirable to the fish, such as cliff side or mountain shadows. Similarly, on a cloudy day, the trout will be closer to the surface because there is less brightness. Most fish do not like clear waters or bright sunlight, so cloudy water and shaded areas are attracters. These factors should be considered in your selection of spots to fish for trout on California waters.

 

 

 

Lake Fishing For Trout

 

A large number of recreational anglers try their luck on lakes when it comes to trout fishing in California. Larger California Rivers and Streams require a little more angling expertise than the average trout lake. In addition, many streams are not as easily reached as most California Lakes. Fishing from a boat will often give the angler a big advantage at catching a trophy sized fish in California waters. By using electronics, the boat angler on California Lakes can monitor the particular depth where the trout are holding as quite often they will suspend in a narrow band of water.

 

Serious trout fishermen in California have come to realize over the years that trolling produces BIG fish. Day in and day out, if you had to depend upon just one method to catch lunker trout - trolling off shore would be your best bet. Any drop-off or ledge characterized by darker water color is considered a prime trolling target on California Lakes. Often these ledges signal the presence of an underwater canyon, old creek channel, or river bed. Trout will suspend and feed both along the edge and in the center of such drop-offs. The outer fringe of weedlines can also be very productive for trollers. More active fish will hide in this cover and will be on the alert for any tempting prey passing near the edge of the weeds. Outside points, the facings of rocky or concrete dams, areas that are known to have submerged underwater springs, the mouth of a sheltered cove or bay, and water near any feeder streams that flow into the lake are also good trolling areas.

 

 

 

River Fishing For Trout

 

 

 

Although many anglers try their luck at California Trout Fishing in Rivers, Streams, and Creeks, only the most knowledgeable learn how to consistently catch quality trout from these waters. It's not overly difficult to catch planters, but trying to land a trophy catch from one of these rivers or streams is another story. Whether you prefer spinning or more traditional fly fishing gear, it is essential to know how to read a stream in order to have your best chance at landing a big catch. Aquatic life in this underwater world tends to move quickly, both predator and prey alike. Thus, it is important to make precise casts with precise offerings to a precise location.

 

In California rivers and streams, the moving current pushes nutrients downstream. These food sources can be collected or funneled into deeper, quieter pools where they then settle down to the bottom. This is a main reason why pools are key fish holding spots in a river or stream. In this area, small sculpin and minnows will seek sanctuary among rocks and boulders. Crayfish, freshwater clams, and snails will be found in calmer deeper pools and shallower backwater areas. It is essential for the trout angler working a stream to understand where such natural food sources will be found. You should then try to use either bait, artificial lures or flies to match this selection of prey both in terms of size and coloration as well as their natural movements through the water.

 

 

 

 

 

Fish Near Natural Food Sources

 

Trout in California waters cannot afford to expend high energy to swim for food since their energy levels can be depleted rapidly. They will therefore tend to stay close to food sources that can be identified as surface or subsurface features. Such features represent good fishing holes and should be sought out. Trout will always prefer to congregate where they can find both shelter and plentiful food sources. In any body of water in California, there will be a tendency for fish to seek out areas where there is a sign of other life activities because these may offer an abundance of food.

 

In most situations, these areas can be identified quite easily by visual means. For example, streams entering the lake, overhanging rocks, weeds, brush, drop-offs, and ledges can be readily identified as features which attract fish because they offer a source of food. In many cases, the same areas that offer shelter to a trout will also offer the same facility to other fish so it is reasonable to expect that trout will stay there to feed. The point is that any feature or structure, above or below the water, that will attract fish and other edible organisms will also attract the predatory trout.

 

Surface Features

Surface features are those that can be determined by a visual inspection of the area. Most of these are easily distinguished, including coves, overhanging trees, waterfalls, and vegetation. For example, coves and points of land offer fish a haven in that these areas typically contain less active waters or they harbor vegetation, have stream outlets, and are therefore more likely to have other life. These areas are typically protected from the elements of wind and storm, allowing various organisms to flourish. The coves, particularly if deep enough to have cooler water, will therefore attract trout.

 

Any place where trees or brush can be noted as hanging over the water are good areas. Surface vegetation is a crucial item in that overhanging brush and trees will create natural places that will have food drop into the water. Similarly, waterfalls or stream entry points will typically pinpoint where debris or food life can be present. This can come in the form of organisms that are washed down stream, or other organisms that like the extra oxygen. Any area where vegetation can be seen at surface, such as reeds, weeds, and brushes, will typically harbor other life forms that may be desirable to a trout. The trout often have a tendency to "cruise" these areas to pick up the odd organism.

 

Subsurface Features

These are features that are not readily distinguished by visual inspection. They are features that you learn to read by other signs and activities. These include underwater vegetation, mud, gravel and rock bottoms, channels, and underwater stream beds. Water vegetation is a source of oxygen as it expels it during the day from photosynthesis. This is where many other edible species are apt to stay. If the water is deep and the water temperature is cooler, the combination will act as an even better attraction. Very often a mud or gravel bottom will harbor places where various life forms can be found foraging, reproducing, or simply living out their existence. Often, the type of bottom will reveal the type of organisms that inhabit it.

 

Stream outlets are very often good sources of food since the stream will carry various debris and food, not only attracting other life, but carrying particles of food as well. Fish will have a tendency to stick around these areas, particularly if the stream creates a channel into the body of water and is situated in a thermocline.

 

 

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